Error message

Notice: Undefined index: content in _drupal_default_html_head() (line 345 of /mnt/stor7-wc1-dfw1/385641/1003268/www.foodlabels.com/web/content/includes/common.inc).

Placing an order

How do I place an order?

Placing an order is an easy 3-step process through our secure server.

  • Start by choosing the services you need for each product
  • Enter your contact information and choose your payment method
  • Provide your product information as directed in the online form

ORDER NOW


How do I choose the right service?

View all of our services and determine what fits your needs. Many clients choose our Full Label Compliance service that takes the product information you provide and delivers the components required for a 100% regulatory compliant food label. The service includes nutrition analysis, a Nutrition Facts label, an ingredient statement including allergen labeling compliance, and help with product naming and label claims. The package also includes label layout instructions and a final label review.

For ongoing regulatory issues, most clients choose our Retained Regulatory Support service. This service includes in-depth regulatory research, outside counsel and regulatory opinion, development of product positioning and regulatory strategy for new/rebranded products, regulatory experts to extend the productivity of your team and on call availability.


Where can I access your order policies?

Access order policies here.


What product info will you need from me?

To start the process you will need to gather the following information about your product: 1) recipe formulation, 2) processing method(s), 3) packaging specifications. It may help to download an Order Guide. After you submit your order with the product worksheet, a regulatory specialist will let you know if additional information is needed and can answer any questions you may have.


Do you need my product sample?

No, product samples are not needed. Food Consulting Company uses database nutritional analyses of your products’ recipe formulations as this method is a better predictor of nutritional content than laboratory analysis of single sample. It is also lower cost.


What's your turnaround time?

Standard Service is delivered in 10 business days. If you prefer an expedited service, you may choose either Priority Service in 5 business days or Overnight Service delivered by the end of the next business day. More about turnaround time in our Order Policies.

 

Food Label Regulations for FDA and USDA

What do I need on my food label to be FDA compliant?

To sell an FDA-regulated product by retail in the US the product label must contain five label components: 1) statement of identity, 2) statement of net content, 3) Nutrition Facts, 4) ingredient statement with allergen labeling compliance, and 5) name and address of manufacturer, packer or distributor. Labeling rules state where each component must be placed, minimum type size requirements, and more.


What do I need on my food label to be USDA-compliant?

In addition to the requirements for FDA regulated foods, USDA requires three additional elements: 1) handling statement, 2) USDA inspection legend, 3) plant establishment number and 4) safe handling instructions when required.


What products are regulated by FDA vs. USDA?

The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) of USDA has authority over meat, poultry and processed egg products; FDA has authority over all other foods.

When meat or poultry is part of a mixed dish product (e.g., pepperoni pizza, chicken noodle soup, side dish with bacon), whether it is regulated under USDA or FDA depends upon the formulation. In general, mixed food products with more than 2% cooked meat or poultry (3% raw) are regulated by USDA; products with 2% or less cooked meat or poultry (3% or less raw) are regulated by FDA. There are, however, some exceptions such as closed-face sandwiches.

USDA-regulated products require FSIS label approval prior to marketing, whereas FDA-regulated products do not.

 

Food Label Regulations by Geography

Can I have one label for both U.S. and Canada?

It is not possible to create one label that will satisfy both U.S. and Canadian labeling requirements because: each country has different requirements for formatting the Nutrition Facts, the rounding rules are different, in some cases the units for reporting nutrients differ, and the countries have established different Daily Values for some nutrients.

Also, the requirements for ingredient/allergen declarations are different, and there are several differences relating to net contents statements, nutrition/health claims, and other aspects of the label.


What do I need on my food label to meet CFIA requirements?

The same five label components are required for FDA and CFIA-compliance, although there are many nuances in the regulations between U.S. and Canada related to content, formatting, placement, etc.


Can I have one label for both U.S. and Mexico?

Until recently this was allowable in some circumstances however, several changes in Mexico’s regulations as of August 2014 no longer make it possible to have one label that will satisfy both countries’ requirements.


What do I need on my food label to meet Mexico requirements?

The same five label components are required for FDA and Mexico regulations, although there are many nuances between U.S. and Mexico related to content, formatting, placement, etc.

 

Food Label Regulations by U.S. Sales Channel

What is needed to sell a product retail?

To sell a retail product regulated by the FDA, the product label must contain five components: 1) statement of identity, 2) statement of net content, 3) Nutrition Facts, 4) ingredient statement with allergen labeling compliance, and 5) name and address of manufacturer, packer or distributor. Labeling rules state where each component must be placed, minimum type size requirements, and more.


What is needed to sell a product wholesale?

Whether you want to sell your product wholesale or retail, there are five mandatory label components required: 1) statement of identity, 2) statement of net content, 3) Nutrition Facts, 4) ingredient statement with allergen labeling compliance, and 5) name and address of manufacturer, packer or distributor.

For wholesale items, the outer packaging (i.e., shipping containers used solely for transportation) does not require the mandatory label components, however the inner packaging does.


What is needed to sell a product for foodservice?

For products sold to foodservice, Nutrition Facts may be omitted if the items will be further processed (not sold in the packaging) and do not carry nutrient content or health claims on the label or labeling. However, most manufacturers of foodservice items choose to include nutrition information voluntarily because many of their customers require it to comply with new restaurant menu labeling regulations.


What is needed to sell a product on the Internet or by mail order?

There are no special provisions for Internet/mail order sales. By law, all foods sold in the U.S. must be in full compliance with FDA labeling requirements that are specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, regardless of the method of sale.


What is needed to sell a product at a farmer's market?

Products sold in farmers markets are required to comply with the same FDA/USDA labeling regulations, unless they qualify for a small business exemption.


What is needed to import a product?

Regardless of whether the product is produced domestically or outside the U.S., FDA/USDA labeling requirements specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations apply.


Is their a small business exemption for manufacturers, packers or distributors?

A low volume exemption from nutrition labeling might apply if the party claiming the exemption employs fewer than 100 full time people and sells fewer than 100,000 units annually in the U.S. For these exemptions, a notice must be filed annually with FDA. There are also exemptions for very small domestic manufacturers, packers and distributors (not importers) with fewer than 10 full time employees who sell less than 10,000 units annually in the U.S. In these circumstances, a notice does not need to be filed with FDA.

When considering an exemption for nutrition labeling it is important to recognize that the presence of any nutrient content claim, health claim or other nutrition information disqualifies the product from this exemption. Also, despite a nutrition labeling exemption, product labels must comply with all other mandatory FDA labeling regulations.


Is their a small business exemption for retailers?

FDA provides a small business exemption for small retailers that meet the qualifications. Specifically, nutrition labeling is not required if the product will be sold only by retailers that have total annual gross sales of $500,000 or less or total annual food gross sales of $50,000. A small business exemption notice does not have to be filed with FDA in this case.

When considering an exemption for nutrition labeling it is important to recognize that the presence of any nutrient content claim, health claim or other nutrition information disqualifies the product from this exemption. Also, despite a nutrition labeling exemption, product labels must comply with all other mandatory FDA labeling regulations.

 

Other Food Labeling Questions

How do I get a UPC barcode?

First you will need to become a member of GS1 US Partner Connections (previously Uniform Code Council). You will then receive a company prefix for use in creating your own UPC barcodes. Note that the UPC barcode is not an FDA/USDA regulatory requirement, however, most retailers will not stock products without them.


Must I have a “Best Before” or “Use By” date?

The need for a freshness date depends on the product category. In general, FDA-regulated products do not require a freshness date, however, retailers use it to rotate stock and consumers use it to be assured of product freshness.


What do I do if we reformulate or rebrand?

When you reformulate or rebrand you must change your product labeling to match the contents of the package. Evaluate the nutrition information, ingredient and allergen statements, product name and all claims to determine what needs to change on your label to ensure regulatory compliance.